Color-Changing Sapphires, A Love Story

We publish courtesy of  Jewelry Insider

Sapphires aren’t just the blingy blue bauble often likened to the color of Elizabeth Taylor’s eyes – they’re crazy chameleons that wear a coat of many colors. While deep blue is certainly what most of us think of when it comes September’s birthstone, the gem also comes in a rainbow of hues – from pink and green to yellow and red (also known as – a ruby!) Cool, right?

But sapphires have a special shade that I recently discovered, and it’s downright drool-worthy: the color-changing sapphire.

Not quite purple, not quite red, not quite blue – the ever-elusive color changer is a slippery little devil that injects some much needed intrigue into the gemstone world. I admittedly just came across the ‘c-c sapph’, when writing about the gorgeous ‘Royal Butterfly’ brooch a few days ago – and decided to do some digging to find out more.

Here’s the skinny:

While many sapphires may exhibit faint color changes upon exposure to incandescent or fluorescent lights, the ‘c-c sapph’ is a dramatic diva, bless her heart. Most color change sapphires belong to one of two groups depending on their color change: the green to red (alexandrite), and the blue to purple kind.

Most alex type color change sapphires are from Songea, Tanzania while the blue-purples occur in Madagascar, Sri Lanka, Burma, and other parts of East Africa and Tanzania.  In all color change stones, the strength of the change is probabably the most important factor affecting their value – but the blue to purple variety tend to be the more pricey option.

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